Archive for the ‘Asthma’ Category

HOW ASTHMA MEDICATIONS CAN BE EFFECTIVELY DELIVERED? IHHALATION METHOD – INHALERS AND CHILDREN

Monday, December 13th, 2010
Inhalers are usually not used correctly. In one study, doctors estimated that on an average only about half of the users of inhalers used them correctly. The biggest problem is the lack of proper coordination between activating the inhaler for medicine release, and breathing the medicine in.
As a rule, it is better for parents to take the inhalers with them when they visit their doctor. The doctor can personally supervise its use by the asthmatic child. MDI must be used correctly since only 10 per cent of the inhaled dose penetrates the distal airways> even with optimal techniques.
For a better penetration to distal airways, a slow and deep inhalation to maximum lung capacity is desirable. Slow inhalation leads to uniform and equal spread of inhaled aerosol particles in the lungs. The proportion of particles remaining in the lungs also increases if breath is held for about 10 seconds.
Some doctors suggest that an inhaler held approximately 2 to 4 cm, in front of an open mouth is superior to an MDI held in, and activated in, a closed mouth. The theoretical advantage of an inhaler held slightly away from open mouth is due to the fact that the particles become smaller as they travel a slightly longer distance from the activated canister orifice to the mouth. This increases distal airway deposition; its disadvantage is the formation of deposits on the lips, face and teeth.
Inhalers can be dangerous if not used properly. Some doctors believe that their use by children should be controlled or supervised by adults. Others recommend that children should not have the inhaler in their possession, but have access to it through an adult. However, this is a personal matter which depends on the age and sense of responsibility of each child. Some young school-going children have learnt to be responsible with inhalers and to use them wisely while others have to be closely supervised. The final decision should be left to the parents who can arrive at a decision after councelling the doctor and other adults, such as school personnel.
Children have to be taught to use all medicines properly, and gradually given the responsibility of taking medicines independently. It is important to remember that children become responsible only when they are given opportunities to practise their skills specially in situations demanding extra care. As in everything else, medication management involves taking small steps towards the ultimate goal of giving the total responsibility to the children.
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HOW ASTHMA MEDICATIONS CAN BE EFFECTIVELY DELIVERED? IHHALATION METHOD – INHALERS AND CHILDRENInhalers are usually not used correctly. In one study, doctors estimated that on an average only about half of the users of inhalers used them correctly. The biggest problem is the lack of proper coordination between activating the inhaler for medicine release, and breathing the medicine in.As a rule, it is better for parents to take the inhalers with them when they visit their doctor. The doctor can personally supervise its use by the asthmatic child. MDI must be used correctly since only 10 per cent of the inhaled dose penetrates the distal airways> even with optimal techniques.For a better penetration to distal airways, a slow and deep inhalation to maximum lung capacity is desirable. Slow inhalation leads to uniform and equal spread of inhaled aerosol particles in the lungs. The proportion of particles remaining in the lungs also increases if breath is held for about 10 seconds.Some doctors suggest that an inhaler held approximately 2 to 4 cm, in front of an open mouth is superior to an MDI held in, and activated in, a closed mouth. The theoretical advantage of an inhaler held slightly away from open mouth is due to the fact that the particles become smaller as they travel a slightly longer distance from the activated canister orifice to the mouth. This increases distal airway deposition; its disadvantage is the formation of deposits on the lips, face and teeth.Inhalers can be dangerous if not used properly. Some doctors believe that their use by children should be controlled or supervised by adults. Others recommend that children should not have the inhaler in their possession, but have access to it through an adult. However, this is a personal matter which depends on the age and sense of responsibility of each child. Some young school-going children have learnt to be responsible with inhalers and to use them wisely while others have to be closely supervised. The final decision should be left to the parents who can arrive at a decision after councelling the doctor and other adults, such as school personnel.Children have to be taught to use all medicines properly, and gradually given the responsibility of taking medicines independently. It is important to remember that children become responsible only when they are given opportunities to practise their skills specially in situations demanding extra care. As in everything else, medication management involves taking small steps towards the ultimate goal of giving the total responsibility to the children.*72\260\8*